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Welcome To The Hard Disk Drive Reference Section
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Overview Of Logical Block Addressing

LBA or Logical Block Addressing rearranges the apparent geometry of a hard disk. LBA is a way of addressing hard drives by assigning numbers sequentially to each sector on a hard drive. The only way LBA can be efficient is if it is used by the operating system and applications on the software side of the BIOS. LBA can be a more efficient method to handle files on drives larger then 528 MB but LBA does not necessarily improve system performance.

SCSI drives always employ LBA, and it is just recently that IDE drives started to use LBA. To implement LBA, both the hard drive and the BIOS, must be aware that the hard drive is in LBA mode and the drive itself must support logical block addressing. On most hard drives, the use of LBA is not required as it; what is required to support a large hard drive is a translating BIOS.

Most drives that support LBA do not require that LBA is used and LBA addressing is not normally required in order for a BIOS to support large drives. What is required to support large drives is a translating BIOS.

 
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