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Introductions To CMOS Settings
Additional CMOS Settings For A Typical Award Software BIOS System
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Introduction To The Basic Input Output System The Power On Self Test (POST Routine) CMOS Settings What's On Board?
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Introduction To CMOS Settings

CMOS is an abbreviation for complementary metal oxide semiconductor and is a memory chip used to store the configuration settings of a system including the date, time, and setup parameters for all hardware components installed in a computer.

CMOS technology is used in microprocessors, microcontrollers, static RAM, and other digital logic circuits. CMOS technology is also used for several analog circuits such as image sensors (CMOS sensor), data converters, and highly integrated transceivers for many types of communication. In 1963, while working for Fairchild Semiconductor, Frank Wanlass patented CMOS.

CMOS is also sometimes referred to as complementary-symmetry metal–oxide–semiconductor (or COS-MOS). The words "complementary-symmetry" refer to the fact that the typical design style with CMOS uses complementary and symmetrical pairs of p-type and n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for logic functions.

Two important characteristics of CMOS devices are high noise immunity and low static power consumption. Since one transistor of the pair is always off, the series combination draws significant power only momentarily during switching between on and off states. Consequently, CMOS devices do not produce as much waste heat as other forms of logic, for example transistor–transistor logic (TTL) or NMOS logic, which normally have some standing current even when not changing state. CMOS also allows a high density of logic functions on a chip.

It was primarily for this reason that CMOS became the most used technology to be implemented in VLSI chips. The phrase "metal–oxide–semiconductor" is a reference to the physical structure of certain field-effect transistors, having a metal gate electrode placed on top of an oxide insulator, which in turn is on top of a semiconductor material. Aluminium was once used but now the material is polysilicon. Other metal gates have made a comeback with the advent of high-k dielectric materials in the CMOS process, as announced by IBM and Intel for the 45 nanometer node and beyond.

This page takes a look into the various configuration settings that make up a particular BIOS.

CMOS-Description
Figure 1.1 - Typical CMOS Settings For A VIA Apollo Chipset Utilizing Award Software BIOS System

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Additional CMOS Settings For A Typical Award Software BIOS System

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